Music- Miss Hannah

Dear Families,

 

Below are resources for your children’s at home musical experience. I posted class projects on the Class Dojo stories feed. See guidelines below for the end of the year Talent Show.  
 

NEW Covid-19 Project:  Mrs. Randle came up with an idea for a Covid-19 song project. Any students in 3rd-5th grade who are interested should read this article written by my close friend Soy Sengvilay, an English teacher in Providence.

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Then access the Teaching Tolerance Learning Plan for more details. https://www.tolerance.org/learning-plan/covid19-write-a-prevention-song-poem-or-rap 

 

For any questions or to share your progress please contact me directly: hresseger@southsideelementary.org 401-473-4372 

Southside Shark Soundcloud Page: (Click on icon)

Students can listen to songs and practice songs for upcoming music videos. 

Note: when we return, songs for video projects will be re-recorded with student vocals.

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Kindness is A Muscle: Sing & Dance Along!

Activity

Beatboxing

Beatmaking:

https://www.incredibox.com/

https://intro.novationmusic.com/viral-hiphop

 

Beatboxing:

Beatboxing For All: https://youtu.be/p5v8EOK_fwM 

Butterscotch “Summertime”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lniRsOblZSg

Spencer X Tutorial for Beginners: https://youtu.be/EAHExoZIgjM 

 
Re-Imagine A World Connected By Music
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August 11, 2017
44th Anniversary of the Birth of Hip Hop


On August 11, 1973, an 18-year-old, Jamaican-American DJ who went by the name of Kool Herc threw a back-to-school jam at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx, New York. During his set, he decided to do something different. Instead of playing the songs in full, he played only their instrumental sections, or “breaks” - sections where he noticed the crowd went wild. During these “breaks” his friend Coke La Rock hyped up the crowd with a microphone. And with that, Hip Hop was born.

Today, we celebrate the 44th anniversary of that very moment with a first-of-its-kind Doodle featuring a custom logo graphic by famed graffiti artist Cey Adams, interactive turntables on which users can mix samples from legendary tracks, and a serving of Hip Hop history - with an emphasis on its founding pioneers. What’s more, the whole experience is narrated by Hip Hop icon Fab 5 Freddy, former host of “Yo! MTV Raps.”

To dig deeper into the significance of this moment and culture from a personal perspective, we invited the project’s executive consultant and partner, YouTube’s Global Head of Music Lyor Cohen (and former head of Def Jam Records), to share his thoughts:

“Yes, yes y'all! And it don't stop!” Today we acknowledge and celebrate a cultural revolution that's spanned 44 years and counting. It all started in the NYC Bronx, more commonly known as the Boogie Down Bronx. Following the fallout from the construction of the Cross Bronx Expressway in 1972 that demolished a lot of the neighborhood, times were particularly tough. The youth needed an outlet -  a unifying sound, a beat, a voice to call their own. The Bronx DJ’s and MC’s rose to the task and the city loved them for it.

Hip Hop was accessible. A kid with little means and hard work could transform their turntable into a powerful instrument of expression (also illustrating hip hop’s technical innovation). Starting with folks like DJ Kool Herc, DJ Hollywood, and Grandmaster Flash, the grassroots movement created a new culture of music, art, and dance available to the 5 boroughs of the city and beyond.

Hip Hop was also rebellion against several norms of the time, including the overwhelming popularity of disco, which many in the community felt had unjustly overshadowed the recent groundbreaking works of James Brown and other soul impresarios from the 60’s. Specifically, they felt that the relatable storytelling and emotional truths shared in soul and blues had been lost in the pop-centric sounds of Disco. So Hip Hop recaptured that connection, beginning with the pioneers who brought back the evocative BOOM! BAP! rhythms of James Brown's drummer, Clyde Stubblefield.

It should be noted that early Hip Hop stood against the violence and drug culture that pervaded the time...

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